you are what you eat…

“Material consisting essentially of protein, carbohydrate, and fat used in the body of an organism to sustain growth, repair, and vital processes and to furnish energy” – the definition of Food in Merriam-Webster.

To my family, this word means much more.  To us, food is everything.  It is the glue that holds us together: a reason to gather and a way to converse with one another.  There is never a second when food is not involved.  I’ve met a few people who eat to live, but every single one of my family members live to eat; and to me, there is absolutely no other way to live life.  However, there is one catch.  The most concise way to explain it is through a quote written by author Michael Pollan, “Eat food, not too much, mostly plants.”

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In general, why is food so important? Well, as the definition clearly states: Food Sustains Life. Without a daily consumption of calories, we wouldn’t be alive for long. Secondly, whatever one chooses to ingest affects each single organ in one’s body.  Upon ingestion, many overlook this fact as hardly any immediate repercussions are felt.  To put it simply, if our bodies do not recognize what is being eaten, our bodies will not function as efficiently. This is why processed foods and whole foods have significantly different impacts on our organs.

For example (click link below to view video):

‘Instant ramen noodles & broth from a packet’ versus ‘Hand-cut ramen noodles & homemade chicken stock’ – as visualized through the human gastrointestinal tract

Cancer occurs in every live human body.  It is not a viral disease or bacterial infection – in other words, cancer is not something that you “catch.”  However, there are an endless amount of carcinogens (cancer causing substances) in this world.  Although we can’t control initial cancer cell growth, since it is unavoidable unless you live in a different universe, we CAN control cancer cell growth in terms of numbers (aka tumor growth).  Diet and exercise are two keys factors in doing so.

For my grandmother, who passed away from lung cancer.  She was the soul of my mother's family.  She taught us all what it meant to be a beast (force to be reckoned with) in the kitchen. I miss her strength and grace.

For my grandmother, who passed away from lung cancer. She was the soul of my mother’s family. A true force to be reckoned with in the kitchen, she taught us all how to appreciate delicious food. I miss her strength and grace.

For my grandfather, who passed away from colon cancer.  He was the heart of my father's family.  He taught us how to truly embrace food as a means for gathering. I miss his smile and his laughter.

For my grandfather, who passed away from colon cancer. He was the heart of my father’s family. He taught us how to truly embrace food as a means for gathering. I miss his smile and laughter.

Why Food Matters” – a subject analyzed by many.
Check out the work of: Mark Bittman, Ruth Reichl, Harold McGee, and of course, Michael Pollan if you are interested in learning more.

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